Bilibili.com is a Shanghai-based video-sharing platform that has attracted over 150 million Chinese users with its eclectic mix of user-generated videos and animations largely inspired by the Japanese world of ACG (animation, tapes comics and games).

Feeling trapped in her “boring” life as a member of China’s modern workforce, “Yaorenmao” escapes online, where she prances and licks herself in cosplay outfits for her 1.3 million fans.

Its alternate world is bilibili.com, a Shanghai-based video sharing platform that has attracted over 150 million Chinese users with its eclectic mix of user-generated videos and animations largely inspired by the Japanese world of ACG. (animation, comics and games).

Spurred in part by a dearth of engaging content aimed at young people in China, where Facebook and YouTube are blocked and media and media are heavily censored, Chinese ACG is emerging as a multi-billion dollar industry, according to analysts, attracting investment in technology. titans such as Tencent and Alibaba.

And with amateur video downloads booming in smartphone addicted China, platforms like bilibili are fueling and capitalizing on how easily the average Chinese man armed with a camera can reach viral stardom.

Twenty-something Yaorenmao, a pseudonym meaning “cat that bites people,” began downloading short DIY videos from her home in southwestern Chengdu city a few years ago in 2011. She dance to sweet-sweet tunes in the clips, playing out an unfulfilled childhood dream of becoming a dancer.

You can never leave

“I worked like a normal person after I graduated (from college), but normal life and work is just too boring,” she said, withholding her real name and background. real job to separate his two lives.

Analysts estimate China's ACG (animation, comic, game) world has more than doubled in the past four years to around 300 million

Analysts estimate that China’s ACG (animation, comic, game) world has more than doubled in the past four years to around 300 million fans whose average spending exceeds 1,700 yuan ($ 255) per year.

Fans piled up, often sending gifts or cash, which she reinvested in increasingly elaborate costumes and sets, including a 10,000 yuan ($ 1,500) trip to Japan to shoot movies. videos during the picturesque cherry blossom season.

His fans approach his amateur work “with a generous heart and encourage me because they want to see me better and better. It’s like they are improving themselves,” she said. to AFP.

Based largely on hugely popular Japanese ACG sites like Niconico, bilibili attracts many with its live commentary feature, in which waves of user remarks cross the screen in real time, often obscuring commented videos.

Bilibili President Chen Rui told AFP that Chinese millennials born in the internet age are increasingly inhabiting the virtual world.

“Everyone is afraid of loneliness and everyone wants a better world where you can say what you think and not have to see people you don’t like,” Chen said.

“Once you have seen the created bilibili world, you cannot leave it.”

Analysts estimate that China’s ACG world has more than doubled in the past four years to reach around 300 million fans whose subculture spending averages over 1,700 yuan ($ 255) per year, and some predict that the industry may one day compete with its Japanese ancestors.

Chen Rui, president of the video-sharing platform bilibili.com, told AFP that Chinese millennials born into the Internet age are growing in number.

Chen Rui, president of the video-sharing platform bilibili.com, told AFP that Chinese millennials born in the Internet age are increasingly inhabiting the virtual world.

Pass to the general public

Bilibili offers a mind-boggling array of material, 70% of which is user-generated, including role-playing games, original home videos like Yaorenmao’s, amateur lifestyle commentary, tech, beauty, fashion. and entertainment, games and of course Japanese animated series.

Even the Communist Youth League opened a bilibili feed containing videos touting the ruling party.

Huang Yanhua, analyst at iResearch Consulting, said the online ACG world in China is in a messy “start-up stage,” but she expects it to serve as an incubator for successful original Chinese content.

“Each generation has its own way of having fun. People born after the 1990s started working and are now the main consumer force in China.

Tencent launched its own bilibili-like site, Tencent Comics, in 2012, and now partners directly with bilibili to produce animated videos. E-commerce giant Alibaba, through its streaming site Youku Tudou, led a $ 50 million investment in bilibili rival Acfun in 2015.

Market analysis firm CIConsulting said the Chinese ACG market has recently grown into a fast-growing multi-billion dollar industry.

Chinese video-sharing platform bilibili.com launched an annual convention in Shanghai in 2013 that attracted just 800 people.  This year'

Chinese video-sharing platform bilibili.com launched an annual convention in Shanghai in 2013 that attracted just 800 people. This year’s event in July attracted over 100,000

Bilibili launched an annual convention in Shanghai in 2013 which only attracted 800 people. This year’s event in July drew over 100,000 downloaders like Yaorenmao and fans, most in their teens or early twenties, and many dressed up flamboyantly in comic book character costumes.

Zeng Hang, general manager of an online military-themed program called “Crazy Warfare-Show,” said the virtual domain is rapidly replacing the real world for countless Chinese millennia grappling with economic, technological and social changes. country rapids.

“They now live in tall apartment buildings in Shanghai and they may not even know the kid next door,” Zeng said.

The often frivolous content of Bilibili is a balm, he said.

“People are under a lot of pressure in China as well, so they like these things. “

“They care more about their existence in the virtual world and are willing to spend on what they love.”


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© 2017 AFP

Quote: Chinese video site offers virtual escape from “boring” reality (2017, September 11) retrieved October 4, 2021 from https://phys.org/news/2017-09-chinese-video-site-virtual-reality .html

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