A little blue penguin stops in front of the Kororā Cam, set up by the Urban Wildlife Trust and NIWA.

Provided

A little blue penguin stops in front of the Kororā Cam, set up by the Urban Wildlife Trust and NIWA.

Anyone with an internet connection can get a glimpse into the secret life of the little blue penguins thanks to the new cameras installed by Urban Wildlife Trust and Niwa.

The Kororā, or little blue penguins, are found along New Zealand’s coast and are only 14 inches tall – the smallest species of penguin in the world.

They visit the mainland between June and March each year to lay eggs, care for their young and moult before returning to sea for food in April and May.

Two high-resolution cameras and an external microphone have been installed in a small blue penguin nesting box in Evans Bay, with Kororā Cam now streaming directly to YouTube.

READ MORE:
* Innovative decals offered as a solution to native birds crashing into Wellington Cable Car terminal
* Developer Shelly Bay responsible for relocating the little blue penguins before work begins
* Distress after the death of the little blue penguin in an alleged dog attack

The Kororā are the smallest penguins in the world.

Provided

The Kororā are the smallest penguins in the world.

Tony Stoddard of the Urban Wildlife Trust hoped that by bringing people closer to the penguins, they would learn a little more about them.

The Kororā are monogamous in each breeding season and share the tasks of incubating and rearing chicks.

“There is a breeding pair living in the nest box, and they really couldn’t be more urban.

“Living on the Niwa property at Greta Point, like any rugged local, the couple don’t even watch the planes take off and land.”

A camera and a penguin nesting box installed at Niwa, Evans Bay.

Provided / Content

A camera and a penguin nesting box installed at Niwa, Evans Bay.

Niwa Wellington regional manager Alison MacDiarmid said it was a privilege to have penguins nesting on their property. For years, Niwa staff have volunteered with Forest and Bird’s Places for Penguins to provide them with safe habitat.

Seabird ecologist Dr David Thompson said korora are very social birds and microphones will provide fascinating information about their varied noises.

There is a related pair of korora living in the nest box on the NIWA property at Greta Point.

Provided

There is a related pair of korora living in the nest box on the NIWA property at Greta Point.

“Kororas are very noisy, especially when nesting at night. They make a variety of sounds, including short “barks”, harsh “growls” and longer calls that sound like braying.

“Male and female penguins vocalize and perform duets while greeting each other.”