Facebook bowed to public pressure and agreed to take down versions of a video showing a baby dived in water and thrown by the head.

Children’s charities had demanded a crackdown on online child abuse after the web company refused to remove a video showing a “terrified and sobbing baby” repeatedly having his head thrown and submerged in a bucket of water. water.

Facebook said last night that the two-minute clip showed ‘baby yoga’ but backed off today and confirmed it would remove all reported cases from the clip appearing on the site where people encourage behavior dangerous.

But that will not remove instances where users “sensitize or condemn the practice”.

Video shows ‘terrified and sobbing baby’ repeatedly thrown by the head and submerged in a bucket of water

The video shows a naked newborn being thrown by the head and plunged into the water.

The two-minute clip shows the screaming baby plunged into a bucket of water by a woman – whose face is not visible.

The child screams loudly as she spins him around by his limbs. The baby’s arms are then pulled even higher, the adult holding them in one hand.

She spins the baby around, her head tilting repeatedly from side to side. She then hangs him upside down by the legs, and swings him by the head, holding his cheeks. The baby is silent then.

The video is believed to be from Indonesia.

Today, a Facebook spokesperson said: “Like others, we find the behavior of this video upsetting and disturbing. In cases like these, we are faced with a difficult choice: to balance the desire of people. people to make people aware of such behavior with the disturbing nature of the video.

“In this case, we remove any reported instances of the Facebook video that are shared by supporting or encouraging this behavior.

“In cases where people raise awareness or condemn the practice, we mark videos flagged as disturbing, which means they have a warning screen and are only accessible to people over the age of 18.”

Site moderators find this inconvenient due to the company’s standards of violence and graphic content.

But he argues he cannot remove anything deemed offensive or controversial, citing the Arab Spring, animal testing cases and images of atrocities as examples of videos that could be shared online.

Facebook Says Two Minute Video Showing Baby Dipped In Water And Tossed By The Head Is 'Yoga'

Facebook Says Two-Minute Video Showing Baby Dipped In Water And Tossed By The Head Is ‘Yoga’

Last night, the NSPCC urged the government to tackle internet businesses by creating an agency that could force them to protect children online.

Managing Director Peter Wanless wrote to Internet Security Minister Baroness Shields and Digital Economy Minister Ed Vaizey: “It is time for social media sites to be held accountable for the content of their web sites. Site (s.”

Lurleen Hilliard, of the Nolonger Victims anti-abuse charity, said: “This is one of the most disgusting videos I have seen. At a minimum, this baby is brain damaged by the shaking. It was torture.

However, Facebook told the Mirror: “This video, which describes a form of baby yoga, does not break our rules.”

The video shows a naked newborn being thrown by the head and plunged into the water.

The two-minute clip shows the screaming baby plunged into a bucket of water by a woman – whose face is not visible.

NSPCC chief Peter Wanless urged government to tackle internet businesses by creating body that could force them to protect children online

NSPCC chief Peter Wanless urged government to tackle internet businesses by creating body that could force them to protect children online

The child screams loudly as she spins him around by his limbs. The baby’s arms are then pulled even higher, the adult holding them in one hand.

She spins the baby in circles, her head tilting repeatedly from side to side. She then hangs him upside down by the legs, and swings him by the head, holding his cheeks. The baby is silent then.

The video is believed to be from Indonesia.

In his letter, Mr Wanless added: “Facebook’s terms and conditions state that it will“ remove graphic images when shared for sadistic pleasure or to celebrate or glorify violence. ”But when it does when asked about the latter film, the official reaction was to say “he is not breaking his policy”.

“The NSPCC believes that we have now reached the long overdue point that it is time for social networking sites to be held accountable for the content of their sites.”

The letter called for the creation of a new body, with the legal powers necessary to ensure that internet companies are “transparent and accountable” when it comes to the safety of children online.

“Such a body or division should also have the power to make legally binding orders requiring Internet companies to take necessary and proportionate measures to protect children online,” Mr. Wanless wrote.

“I firmly believe that this matter is too serious to be allowed to continue, so I urge you to reconvene a meeting of the companies concerned so that we can finally get decisive action.”

The letter was copied to Simon Milner, UK policy director for Facebook.

Gabrielle Shaw, Executive Director of the National Association for People Abused in Childhood, said, “Reject this video of a crying baby being violently shaken and manipulated in a tub of water as a form of ‘baby yoga’.

“The fact that Facebook looked at him and allowed him to stand is astounding. It is urgent to wonder why Facebook seems to tolerate what is essentially a form of child abuse. ‘

Lurleen Hilliard, founder of Nolonger Victims, a global charity campaigning against abuse, said she feared the baby may have been killed by the abuse in the video.

“This is one of the craziest videos I have ever seen in my life,” she told the Mirror. “At the very least, this baby is brain damaged from the shaking.

“This baby was thrown and turned, and his skin was turning red from very hot water or very cold water. It was torture.