[ad_1]

Hurricane IDA is now a Category 4 storm and Louisiana is preparing for this monster to make landfall today.

Extremely fatal storm surge flooding of 9 feet or more above ground level is imminent somewhere in the Burns Point, Louisiana area of ​​Ocean Springs, Mississippi.

Crossing local dikes outside of the hurricane and storm risk reduction system is possible when local flood values ​​may be higher. Interests throughout the storm surge warning area should follow any advice given by local authorities.

Catastrophic wind damage is likely where Ida’s core moves shoreward along the southeastern coast of Louisiana over the next few hours. Hurricane-force winds are expected today in the hurricane warning zone along the Louisiana coast, including the New Orleans metropolitan area.

Destructive winds, especially gusty, will spread inland near the central Ida trail over parts of southeastern Louisiana and southwestern Mississippi today through Monday morning. These winds are likely to cause extensive damage to trees and power outages.

Just the weather is live with webcams in New Orleans:

Ida will produce heavy precipitation today through Monday over the central Gulf Coast of southeastern Louisiana, on the Mississippi coast, to the far southwest of Alabama, resulting in flash flooding urban and even fatal and significant impacts on river flooding.

As Ida moves inland, significant flooding is possible in parts of the lower Mississippi, Tennessee and Ohio valleys through Wednesday.

Data from the NOAA Hurricane Hunter aircraft indicates maximum sustained winds are near 105 mph (165 km / h) with higher gusts.

“Rapid strengthening is expected over the next 12 to 24 hours and Ida is expected to be an extremely dangerous major hurricane when it hits the Louisiana coast on Sunday. Rapid weakening is expected after landing,” said the National Hurricane Center.

Hurricane force winds extend outward up to 30 miles (45 km) from the center, and tropical storm force winds extend outward up to 125 miles (205 km).

The combination of a dangerous storm surge and the tide will cause flooding of normally dry areas near the coast by rising waters moving inland from the shore. Water could reach the following heights above the ground somewhere in the areas shown if the surge peak occurs at the time of high tide.

The combination of a dangerous storm surge and the tide will cause flooding of normally dry areas near the coast by rising waters moving inland from the shore. The water could reach the following heights above the ground somewhere in the indicated areas if the surge peak occurs at the time of high tide …

  • Port Fourchon, LA to the mouth of the Mississippi River… 12 to 16 feet
  • Morgan City, LA to Port Fourchon, LA… 8-12 ft
  • From the mouth of the Mississippi River to St. Louis Bay, MS, including Borgne Lake… 8 to 12 feet
  • Burns Point, LA to Morgan City, LA… 6-9ft
  • Bay St. Louis, MS to Ocean Springs, MS… 6-9 ft
  • Lac Pontchartrain… 5-8 ft
  • Ocean Springs, MS border to MS / AL… 4 to 7 ft
  • Intracoastal City, LA to Burns Point, LA including Vermilion Bay… 4-6 ft
  • Maurepas Lake… 4-6 ft
  • Pecan Island, LA to Intracoastal City, LA… 2-4 ft
  • MS / AL edging to AL / FL edging, including Mobile Bay… 3 to 5 ‘
  • Sabine Pass in Pecan Island, LA… 1-3ft
  • AL / FL border to Okaloosa / Walton County Line including Pensacola Bay… 1-3ft

Support journalism by by clicking here on our GoFundMe or subscribe to our free newsletter by clicking here

Android users, Click here to download the free press app And never miss a story. It’s free and coming soon to Apple users

[ad_2]